1. Code it right.

Ensure web and mobile systems are coded in a way that conforms to most widely used standards for digital accessibility: the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) version 2.1 Level AA.

Go deeper:

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2. Ensure it actually works for people with disabilities.

Have people with disabilities complete user testing of the systems. According to the 2020 State of Digital Accessibility Report, 56% of organizations omit this very important part of the process. (94% of those same people agree it’s important to do… they’re just not doing it.)

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3. Get an audit once a year.

Have a qualified third-party expert in digital accessibility validate the system. Many of these experts have people with disabilities on staff, so you’d check off #2 at the same time!

Go deeper:

Connect with a Digital Accessibility Expert

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4. Monitor the lifecycle.

Monitor the accessibility of systems in development and production. Accessibility issues have a tendency to sneak into your code much like any other bug.

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5. Train your team.

Deploy training on digital accessibility requirements into development and content teams. The most successful organizations tell us that they consider accessibility to be part of everyone’s job.

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6. Provide software.

Provide tools to validate accessibility in the content creation and code development process. The best tools are the ones that your content creators and developers want to use, so shop around for the right fit for your team. (Even if it isn’t us.)

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7. Support your authors and developers.

Provide expert support to your team as they are implementing and maintaining accessibility. Having a partnership with a digital accessibility firm lets you tap in to expertise when you need it.

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8. Set a formal policy.

Provide a structured and consistently applied set of digital accessibility policies and practices.

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9. Collect user feedback on issues.

Have (an accessible) method of collecting user feedback on digital accessibility issues.

A simple way to do this is to have a dedicated email address for accessibility concerns that is monitored daily.

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10. Provide support to people with disabilities.

Ensure there is a method of supporting users with disabilities in their access of your system.

In an ideal world, every customer support representative would be trained in accessibility. But in reality, as long as at least one person per shift is trained, they can correctly document the problem and help find a solution.